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The Map of Physics

The Map of Physics


The Map of Physics
Everything we know about physics – and a few things we don’t – in a simple map.

Errata and clarifications.

I endeavour to be as accurate as possible in my videos, but I am human and definitely don’t know everything, so there are sometimes mistakes. Also, due to the nature of my videos, there are bound to be oversimplifications. Some of these are intentional because I don’t have time to go into full detail, but sometimes they are unintentional and here is where I clear them up.

1. “Isaac Newton invented calculus.” Actually there is controversy over who invented calculus first Isaac Newton or Gottfried Leibniz. Regardless of who it was I have used Leibniz’s mathematical notation here and so he definitely deserves credit. I did’t know about all this so thanks to those who pointed it out.

2. “Maxwell derived the laws of electromagnetism.” This is a simplification as Maxwell’s work was built on the backs of other scientists like Hans Christian Ørsted, André-Marie Ampère and Michael Faraday who discovered induction and saw that electricity and magnetism were part of the same thing. But it was Maxwell who worked out all the maths and brought electricity and magnetism together into a unified theory. Electromagnetism#History_of_the_theory

3. “Entropy is a measure of order and disorder”. This is also a simplification and this does a good job of explaining it better

4. Einstein and Quantum physics: I made it sound like quantum physics was built by people other than Einstein, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Einstein got a Nobel prize for his work on the photoelectric effect which was a key result to show the particle-like nature of light. Funnily enough he never got a nobel prize for his work on Relativity!

Also, if you enjoyed this video, you will probably like my science books, available in all good books shops around the work and is printed in 16 languages. Links are below or just search for Professor Astro Cat. They are fun children’s books aimed at the age range 7-12. But they are also a hit with adults who want good explanations of science. The books have won awards and the app won a Webby.

 

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